"puppy parole" (or "pooch parole")

hypothesis

I recently mentioned to some friends (who had adopted one of our foster dogs) that our local shelter can be used as a "doggy lending library." I suggested that they could audition a dog who they thought might get along well with their dog and cat by fostering for as brief a time as they wanted. They seemed surprised that they could get a dog with such a small commitment.

Short-term shelter dog foster care might just be a secret that needs to be shared. Adding a dog to a family should be a major permanent commitment. The shelter is evidence that such commitments are frequently broken but there is significant demand for canine companionship.

I contend that there is a large group of people who are not involved with animal shelters but would benefit from providing short-term foster care. Tailoring a program to suit these people will allow us to tap a new resource for handling dogs.

discussion

This program should be treated separately from established foster care and adoption programs. The goal is to involve people who have not shown a sufficient interest in those programs.

target "puppy parole officers"